Bummer. Sonic purveyors Darkside have announced on social media that they’re “coming to an end, for now”, but not before Nicolas Jaar and Dave Harrington fortified their legacy by sharing two unreleased tracks from the ‘Psychic’ sessions, one aptly titled ‘Gone Too Soon’. Sample them below, before both tracks are available on the forthcoming Other People compilation ‘Work’. Darkside will play their last show in Brooklyn on September 12.

algopop

algopop:

MuseumBot and AppreciationBot

MuseumBot tweets images from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, AppreciationBot was designed to be an enthusiastic critic of everything MuseumBot shares. The endless automated dialogue between the two has some fascinating interactions and greater than the sum of its parts so I created this list to follow it. The bots are by Darius Kazemi and Michael Cook respectively. 

standardgrey
The precise nature of the physiological attraction of television has yet to be specified, and may never be, but a huge amount of statistical and anecdotal evidence obviously has confirmed the truism that it has potent addictive properties. However, television posed the unusual phenomenon of an addictiveness to something that failed to deliver the most basic reward of a habit-forming substance: that is, it provides not even a temporary heightened sense of well-being or pleasure, or a gratifying if brief fall into insensate numbness. Moments after turning on a television, there is no detectable rush or charge of sensation of any kind. Rather, there is a slow shift into a vacancy from which one finds it difficult to disengage. This is a decisive trait of the era of technological addictiveness: that one can return again and again to a neutral void that has little affective intensity of any kind. In the widely noted study by Kubey and Csikszentmihalyi, the majority of their subjects reported that extended TV viewing made them feel worse than when they did not watch, yet they felt compelled to continue their behavior. The longer they watched, the worse they felt. The hundreds of studies on depression and internet use show similar kinds of results.
failedprojects

Wanna See Me Disco? Fundraiser Dance Party, 9/20/14

failedprojects:

image

image

Join us on Saturday, September 20, 2014 at Richlane for a rebel grrrl dance party with famous feminist-themed drinks!

Celebrate and support the production of new feminist discourse and the work of contemporary women artists. We will be passing the hat, however, please note: donations are encouraged, not mandatory. We value presence over presents.

Proceeds will go toward the upcoming discussion series, All My Little Words, and group exhibition, Miss World, at PARMER in October 2014.

RSVP ON FACEBOOK

image

If you’re in NYC.

tphd

tphd:

the secret music of my hands grasping the bottle
and the satisfying cracking as i twist the seal
and then hold it up to the light

the liquid somewhere between gasoline and magic

the first taste of liquor is like a trumpet blown directly
down my throat

if gravity is real, EVERYTHING on the surface of earth is
trying to get to the center but gets interrupted somewhere
along the way

the second feels like swallowing an entire fur coat

like how millionaires do

for dinner

i take a third and i can wonder

if an octopus, ANY octopus, has ever been drunk
AND imagine eating an entire cello at the same time

there’s no laws against it and anyway I’m an outlaw

but a casual outlaw

i’m an outlaw, except i don’t make a big deal about it

you can probably already tell by the cut of my jeans

and here is an open invitation to imagine an octopus
wearing a pair of jeans

feel free to redeem at any time

it’s a great time to be alive

even if almost all evidence points
to the contrary

Earnest: I think you’re the smartest person defending some of this work—the people advocating for it are generally not doing so in a way that seems nuanced or aesthetically aware—or more accurately the only people advocating for it are doing so with large sums of mute money. How do you see it related to the work you’ve done on mid-20th Century painting?

Bacon: I came to it all from a historical angle. I was someone who had thought he was going to be a contemporary art historian, but then didn’t really like most contemporary art so I moved into the past and dealt with minimalism. Around 2011 I became interested in Kassay and wanted to know more about his work. I was also confused because the abstraction from the midcentury had a lot of critical and academic success but not much mainstream appeal , and here we are talking about the reverse where critics and academics are not interested, but it is popular. Everyday people love to look at these paintings, which is odd considering they would deface Barnett Newmans and Ad Reinhardts in the ’60s. The work touches on a lot of these issues. It deals with image culture, the screen, abstraction in general. What does abstraction mean in a world where images have the same real-world value as objects? Barbara Rose wrote of op art in 1965 that it was the first brand of modernist folk-art, that it spoke to certain ideals around medium specificity and perceptual purity but was packaged in a way that was very appealing to a general audience.

Artists by row, top to bottom: Lucien Smith, Oscar Murillo, Parker Ito, Wade Guyton, Jacob Kassay, Lucien Smith. Courtesy of the Internet.
Print Issue 17 Pullout: Who’s Afraid of the New Abstraction? | SFAQ Online

For this reason all the critics who simply allow the market to dictate the terms of the conversation become willful participants in the silencing of political activity and discourse, they essentially let the wealthy few who benefit from the market win by accepting their terms as the terms of the conversation. Meanwhile they continue to write pallid defenses of the now empty and academic gestures of third, fourth, fifth generation neo-conceptual, performance, and installation art that finds sanction only within academies and institutions. An issue that is equally problematic, in my eyes. It cannot be so simple an equation as market interest in a certain kind of art means that it is inherently suspect. In certain ways the market may be more visible, vocal, and active than before, but again this has to do with larger socio-economic issues that have, with time, inevitably entered the orbit of art, than the “quality” of the work being produced at the moment. When Jerry Saltz asks, “why does so much new abstraction look the same?” I respond by asking “why does so much art, period, look the same today?” What are the larger systems that allow for an unprecedentedly large number of artists to share some part of the spotlight and to produce work that emerges from a similar set of precedents, deals with a similar set of issues and, yes, bears superficial formal similarities. A pious refusal of money, which I would point out is not even necessarily a possibility on the part of these young artists who have found their production quite literally annexed by speculators (save full-fledged dropping out of the system, and even then I’m not so sure since artists have concluded production on several of the bodies of work that, at one time or another, drew the interest of speculators), and the work has continued to be traded back and forth, often resulting in market ignorance of the subsequent work made by these artists.

Artists by row, top to bottom:
Lucien Smith, Oscar Murillo, Parker Ito, Wade Guyton, Jacob Kassay, Lucien Smith. Courtesy of the Internet.

Print Issue 17 Pullout: Who’s Afraid of the New Abstraction? | SFAQ Online

For this reason all the critics who simply allow the market to dictate the terms of the conversation become willful participants in the silencing of political activity and discourse, they essentially let the wealthy few who benefit from the market win by accepting their terms as the terms of the conversation. Meanwhile they continue to write pallid defenses of the now empty and academic gestures of third, fourth, fifth generation neo-conceptual, performance, and installation art that finds sanction only within academies and institutions. An issue that is equally problematic, in my eyes. It cannot be so simple an equation as market interest in a certain kind of art means that it is inherently suspect. In certain ways the market may be more visible, vocal, and active than before, but again this has to do with larger socio-economic issues that have, with time, inevitably entered the orbit of art, than the “quality” of the work being produced at the moment.

When Jerry Saltz asks, “why does so much new abstraction look the same?” I respond by asking “why does so much art, period, look the same today?” What are the larger systems that allow for an unprecedentedly large number of artists to share some part of the spotlight and to produce work that emerges from a similar set of precedents, deals with a similar set of issues and, yes, bears superficial formal similarities. A pious refusal of money, which I would point out is not even necessarily a possibility on the part of these young artists who have found their production quite literally annexed by speculators (save full-fledged dropping out of the system, and even then I’m not so sure since artists have concluded production on several of the bodies of work that, at one time or another, drew the interest of speculators), and the work has continued to be traded back and forth, often resulting in market ignorance of the subsequent work made by these artists.

❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤
LSD=John Lennon
Bobo Eyes~ THINKSTR8(cellphone mix) -
Gaza Tech ~ I ‘m Okay
GG love ~ don’t know
Neo Image ~ jr-east
Almandine ~ Fade Away
Keiza~Hideaway
Cloudface~dojo bounce
BOBOeyes ~ Seaside
Ramona Lisa~Backwards
PATRICIA~Tough Guise
Shura~Touch
MPL~These Things
RegularFantasy~Ride
riohv~Bipolar
boboEyes~BONUS TRACK!
Zanzibar Chanel~ASS
C3DEEE~zkorg strings.2
Big Boy Mouse~#1sideA.5
lonely flute~work4whatuwantsoucanfeelit
Bryan Ferry~Jealous Guy(John Lennon)
❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤