baberainbow
baberainbow:

Dummy Mix 218 // Babe Rainbow | Dummy
I made a mix for Dummy. Please enjoy.
Tracklist:
01. John Cage recorded at the Anthony d’Offay Gallery, London, in 1989 02. Trust Blush (demo) 03. TCF ae3f3c9a1faf1d1f7288d16148703afb8b3e66f0afdf049217e6193b268 04. Andy Stott Dark Details 05. Joane Skyler Foam 06. Lubomyr Melnyk The Eastern Horn (For 2 Pianos And 3 Contrabass) [Excerpt] 07. Wim Mertens Gentlemen of Leisure 08. Arthur Russell In Light Of The Miracle 09. Pender Street Steppers Openin Up 10. Arca Manners (Blend) 11. Konk Your Life 12. Heartbeat(s) Hocus Pocus (feat. Angelina Lucero) 13. Liquid Liquid Locked Groove (In) 14. Brian Eno & Robert Fripp Altair 15. Outkast Da Art Of Storytellin’, Pt. 1 16. Oneohtrix Point Never He She 17. Ricky Eat Acid God puts us all in the swimming pool 18. Avro Pärt My Heart’s In The Highlands 19. Nick Krgovich Constant Craving (k.d. lang cover) 20. Lana Del Ray Born To Die (Clams Casino Remix Instrumental) 21. Ensemble Economique Everything I Have, I Give To You 22. The Microphones Instrumental 23. Dan Mangan & Amy Millan Chances Are (Instrumental) 24. John Cage recorded at the Anthony d’Offay Gallery, London, in 1989

nice

baberainbow:

Dummy Mix 218 // Babe Rainbow | Dummy

I made a mix for Dummy. Please enjoy.

Tracklist:

01. John Cage recorded at the Anthony d’Offay Gallery, London, in 1989
02. Trust Blush (demo)
03. TCF ae3f3c9a1faf1d1f7288d16148703afb8b3e66f0afdf049217e6193b268
04. Andy Stott Dark Details
05. Joane Skyler Foam
06. Lubomyr Melnyk The Eastern Horn (For 2 Pianos And 3 Contrabass) [Excerpt]
07. Wim Mertens Gentlemen of Leisure
08. Arthur Russell In Light Of The Miracle
09. Pender Street Steppers Openin Up
10. Arca Manners (Blend)
11. Konk Your Life
12. Heartbeat(s) Hocus Pocus (feat. Angelina Lucero)
13. Liquid Liquid Locked Groove (In)
14. Brian Eno & Robert Fripp Altair
15. Outkast Da Art Of Storytellin’, Pt. 1
16. Oneohtrix Point Never He She
17. Ricky Eat Acid God puts us all in the swimming pool
18. Avro Pärt My Heart’s In The Highlands
19. Nick Krgovich Constant Craving (k.d. lang cover)
20. Lana Del Ray Born To Die (Clams Casino Remix Instrumental)
21. Ensemble Economique Everything I Have, I Give To You
22. The Microphones Instrumental
23. Dan Mangan & Amy Millan Chances Are (Instrumental)
24. John Cage recorded at the Anthony d’Offay Gallery, London, in 1989

nice

unmarkedlandmarks
unmarkedlandmarks:

Morning and it’s Summer
The Creative Act (excerpt) - Marcel DuchampL’Homme Solitaire - Les Temps HeureuxLenda das Amazonas - Burnier & Cartier20th Century - The Brazda Brothers
Summertime - Montreal
Pelas Ruas Do Meu Bairro - Antônio Adolfo & A BrazucaSusto - EdnardoLisa - AgincourtImperial Gold (feat. Joanne Robertson) - Dean BluntSummer Sunday Blues - FriendsIt’s So Easy - Ted LucasRam On - Paul McCartneyMasculino, Feminino - Erasmo Carlos
Kids and Dogs - David Crosby & Jerry Garcia

Another essential mix from Maryanne!

unmarkedlandmarks:

Morning and it’s Summer

The Creative Act (excerpt) - Marcel Duchamp
L’Homme Solitaire - Les Temps Heureux
Lenda das Amazonas - Burnier & Cartier
20th Century - The Brazda Brothers
Summertime - Montreal
Pelas Ruas Do Meu Bairro - Antônio Adolfo & A Brazuca
Susto - Ednardo
Lisa - Agincourt
Imperial Gold (feat. Joanne Robertson) - Dean Blunt
Summer Sunday Blues - Friends
It’s So Easy - Ted Lucas
Ram On - Paul McCartney
Masculino, Feminino - Erasmo Carlos
Kids and Dogs - David Crosby & Jerry Garcia

Another essential mix from Maryanne!

But here is the ultimate consequence of the internet moving offline. If images can be shared and circulated, why can’t everything else be too? If data moves across screens, so can its material incarnations move across shop windows and other enclosures. If copyright can be dodged and called into question, why can’t private property? If one can share a restaurant dish JPEG on Facebook, why not the real meal? Why not apply fair use to space, parks, and swimming pools? Why only claim open access to JSTOR and not MIT—or any school, hospital, or university for that matter? Why shouldn’t data clouds discharge as storming supermarkets? Why not open-source water, energy, and Dom Pérignon champagne?

If circulationism is to mean anything, it has to move into the world of offline distribution, of 3D dissemination of resources, of music, land, and inspiration. Why not slowly withdraw from an undead internet to build a few others next to it?

Somehow I hadn’t yet read this clearly seminal essay by Hito Steyerl from 2013. 

I suggest that we learn to think about capitalism coming to an end without assuming responsibility for answering the question of what one proposes to put in its place. It is a Marxist—or better: modernist—prejudice that capitalism as a historical epoch will end only when a new, better society is in sight, and a revolutionary subject ready to implement it for the advancement of mankind. This presupposes a degree of political control over our common fate of which we cannot even dream after the destruction of collective agency, and indeed the hope for it, in the neoliberal-globalist revolution. Neither a utopian vision of an alternative future nor superhuman foresight should be required to validate the claim that capitalism is facing its Götterdämmerung.I am willing to make exactly this claim, although I am aware of how many times capitalism has been declared dead in the past. In fact, all of the main theorists of capitalism have predicted its impending expiry, ever since the concept came into use in the mid-1800s. This includes not just radical critics like Marx or Polanyi, but also bourgeois theorists such as Weber, Schumpeter, Sombart and Keynes.

That something has failed to happen, in spite of reasonable predictions that it would, does not mean that it will never happen; here, too, there is no inductive proof. I believe that this time is different, one symptom being that even capitalism’s master technicians have no clue today how to make the system whole again—see, for example, the recently published minutes of the deliberations of the Federal Reserve’s board in 2008, or the desperate search of central bankers, mentioned above, for the right moment to end ‘quantitative easing’. This, however, is only the surface of the problem. Beneath it is the stark fact that capitalist progress has by now more or less destroyed any agency that could stabilize it by limiting it; the point being that the stability of capitalism as a socio-economic system depends on its Eigendynamik being contained by countervailing forces—by collective interests and institutions subjecting capital accumulation to social checks and balances. The implication is that capitalism may undermine itself by being too successful.

Every age has a theory of rising and falling, of growth and decay, of bloom and wilt: a theory of nature. Every age also has a theory about the past and the present, of what was and what is, a notion of time: a theory of history. Theories of history used to be supernatural: the divine ruled time; the hand of God, a special providence, lay behind the fall of each sparrow. If the present differed from the past, it was usually worse: supernatural theories of history tend to involve decline, a fall from grace, the loss of God’s favor, corruption. Beginning in the eighteenth century, as the intellectual historian Dorothy Ross once pointed out, theories of history became secular; then they started something new—historicism, the idea “that all events in historical time can be explained by prior events in historical time.” Things began looking up. First, there was that, then there was this, and this is better than that. The eighteenth century embraced the idea of progress; the nineteenth century had evolution; the twentieth century had growth and then innovation. Our era has disruption, which, despite its futurism, is atavistic. It’s a theory of history founded on a profound anxiety about financial collapse, an apocalyptic fear of global devastation, and shaky evidence.
katherinestasaph

With algorithmic culture, computers and algorithms are allowing a new level of real-time personalization and content selection on an individual basis that just wasn’t possible before. But rather than use these tools to serve our authentic interests, we have built a system that often serves a commercial interest that is often at odds with our interests – that’s corrupt personalization.

If I use the dominant forms of communication online today (Facebook, Google, Twitter, YouTube, etc.) I can expect content customized for others to use my name and my words without my consent, in ways I wouldn’t approve of. Content “personalized” for me includes material I don’t want, and obscures material that I do want. And it does so in a way that I may not be aware of.

Fascinating, super relevant post on how algorithms of websites like Facebook are making “our” interests their interests.